Glen Campbell – more than just a rhinestone cowboy

Mention the name ‘Glen Campbell’ to most people and they’ll probably say ‘Rhinestone Cowboy’ or ‘Wichita Linesman’.

However, there’s much, much more to the guy than a few hit records.

I’m prompted to write about Glen because of the sad news that he’s just released what will be his final album and is just about to embark on his last tour because he has Alzheimer’s and won’t be able to do much of anything eventually.

But what is it about him that raises his significance above a few hit records?

Well, you’ve probably heard him more often than you realise because he started off as a session guitarist.  Here what his Wikipedia entry has to say about him:

In 1958, Campbell moved to Los Angeles to become a session musician. He was part of the 1959 line-up of the group the Champs, famous for their instrumental "Tequila". Campbell was in great demand as a session musician in the 1960s. He was part of the studio musicians clique known as "the Wrecking Crew", many of whom went from session to session together as the same group. In addition to Campbell, Hal Blaine on drums, Tommy Tedesco on guitar, Leon Russell on piano, Carol Kaye on bass guitar, Al Casey on guitar were part of this group of session musicians that defined many pop and rock recordings of the era. They were also heard on Phil Spector’s "Wall of Sound" recordings in the early 1960s.

You had to be a consummate musician to be part of the Crew – not just technically brilliant, but able to record track after track as quickly as possible.

He also played on various Beach Boys sessions, including those which produced the sublime Brian Wilson masterpiece ‘Pet Sounds’.

So deeply did Campbell impress Wilson and the rest of the band, that when Brian decided to give up touring and just work in the studio, Campbell joined the band on bass and falsetto harmonies.

 

Beachboys

From L to R – Carl Wilson, Mike Love, Glen Campbell, Dennis Wilson, Al Jardine

During this period, he also contributed to a whole slew of cheapo instrumental albums which spotlighted the guitar – this being a very guitar-orientated time in music. This is actually when I first became aware of him as a friend had an LP (remember those?) with Campbell featured on 12-string guitar, which was all the rage then due to its use in folk as well as by the Beatles and the Byrds.

After his stint with the Beach Boys, Campbell embarked on a very successful solo career. Fortunately, he had good taste in material and covered songs by people like John Hartford, Allen Toussaint and, most notably, Jimmy Webb.

It’s fair to say that Campbell has had his fair share of demons with a recurrent drink problem which came to a head when he was arrested for leaving the scene of a road traffic accident when drunk and assault on a police officer – the latter charge was dropped.

His career had a bit of a renaissance in 2008, after several years going through the motions on the usual circuit of venues demanding the ‘golden oldies’, with the release of a new album that once again showed his great taste in covers:

It was announced in April 2008 that Campbell was returning to his signature label, Capitol, to release his new album, Meet Glen Campbell. The album was released on August 19. With this album he branched off in a different musical direction, covering tracks from artists such as Travis, U2, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Jackson Browne and Foo Fighters. It was Campbell’s first release on Capitol in over 15 years. Musicians from Cheap Trick and Jellyfish contributed to the album as well. The first single, a cover of Green Day’s "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)", was released to radio in July 2008.

As good as this album is, I don’t think it’s up to the standard of his latest and last offering, ‘Ghost on the Canvas’. This is available from iTunes at a good price and is well worth the download, especially with 2 bonus tracks.

The material is great, with ex-Jellyfish Roger Joseph Manning, Jr. contributing a lot of songs and the session players include all manner of people – listed here.

But back to what originally started off what is a long and successful career – his guitar playing.

Here he is – in 2008 – playing some very nice country style licks:

Great octave work and a very fluent left hand.

How about this – jamming with Steve Lukather on acoustic?

 

.

OK, a bit corny I know, but here’s Glen with the late, great Jerry Reed, who Steve Lukather mentioned in the preceding video:

 

To end with, Glen on electric 12-string doing what is very difficult on one of them. No, not fretting it (although for anyone with normal-sized fingers that’s tricky enough!) but bending the strings. Audio only, I’m afraid…

 

Thanks, Glen, and good luck where you’re going.

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7 Responses

  1. After the first YouTube video there’s one of him playing the William Tell Overture on an electric 12 behind his head…….

  2. Yes, Mr Rob, I saw that and decided it was a little too cheesy for inclusion here.

    Good though, isn’t it?

  3. Sometimes you have to be really good to be cheesy – fucking up in those circumstances really isn’t an option 🙂

  4. […] Posts Glen Campbell – more than just a rhinestone cowboyConservativehome now delusional A ploughman’s and a promenadeA lot of fosse about […]

  5. Very true!
    Another of my all-time favourite players, Danny Gatton, built much of his career on cheese.
    To whit:

  6. Absolutely fantastic!

    Learn this piece and don’t come back until you can play it through a towel!

    Rum looking bunch of blokes though.

  7. Aging rockabillies!

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